Copy of Faculty Highlight - Emma Sosebee

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Since the move to our current location, Emma has been a regular friendly face for all to see each day as our dedicated runner and morning receptionist. Even though she is our youngest employee at No Barks About It, Emma has never shied away from responsibility nor let her age and inexperience dampen her work ethic. Over the last year she has blossomed into a formidably reliable, capable, and driven member of the NBAI staff, without whom we couldn’t claim to be the friendly and welcoming small business we are today.

An animal-lover at heart, she has a special relationship with her two cats Umi and Sakura and, although she doesn’t have any dogs at home, she considered each daycare dog as one of her own, having developed a caring and working relationship with each one as they regularly attend Dayschool. Her experience in walking neighborhood dogs and raising chickens (including the occasional opinionated rooster) helped foster a natural confidence when it came to handling dogs in our care in a professional setting.

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Emma also boasts a unique sophistication when it comes to world travel; having been to international locations like Japan, New Zealand, the Bahamas, and Australia as well as the better part of the USA. She is even experienced in conversational Japanese!

One fun fact about Emma that may already be known to some is her love of dance and theater. Having danced on a competitive team for three years, she is now involved with Circus Culture classes as well as local theater groups having only recently performed in the Running to Places production of Annie. Emma also enjoys photography and watching scary movies with friends and hopes to one day pursue a career in museum work or art history.

Some of Emma’s favorite daycare dogs are listed below:

Gus - Goofy

Gus - Goofy

Finn - Sweet

Finn - Sweet

Hermi - Silly

Hermi - Silly

Faculty Highlight - Oluademi James-Daniel

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Oluademi James-Daniel joined No Barks About It in 2014 as a daycare assistant and has blossomed over the last five years into an integral member of the NBAI family. Today she is our Dayschool Coordinator and newly certified CGC Evaluator, so you may have already had the pleasure of meeting her in one capacity or another.

Having started with experience with shelter care in Long Island and a degree in English Literature and creative writing, Oluademi brought a lifetime of specialized knowledge of dog breeds and behavior to NBAI. She also boasts the natural gift of successfully translating the language of dog into words and ideas that us humans can better understand! As a result, Olua has worked tirelessly to help develop our unique Dayschool program; learning and developing training protocols, management techniques, add-on services, and staff education curricula. Her dedication to the business and its people (both employees and clients alike) has no doubt been one of the keys to our continued success.

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Oluademi is currently leading our Puppy Social and AKC Puppy STAR evening classes as well as the Electives and Day Training sessions offered as part of our daycare program. As if that isn’t enough to keep a person busy, she has also recently established a local reptile rescue and is working to train her Windsprite, Juliet, to be a licensed therapy dog, as well as dabbling in ball python breeding and other animal husbandry!

Some of her favorite aspects of working at NBAI is helping to problem-solve and research effective behavior modification training, seeing improvements in dogs and their relationship with their people, and making lasting friendships with her coworkers.

“The more ‘difficult’ they are perceived, the more I’ll adore them. There is no such thing as a ‘bad’ dog, just a misunderstood one,” she says of her most notable challenging dogs, including her own Yorkie mix at home, Ginger.

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Oluademi hopes to one day open a rescue for senior pets and start an education program focused on teaching teens about commonly misunderstood animals like spiders, snakes, and dogs.

In the meantime, she will be spearheading the new NBAI puppy head start daycare program: PupK puppy kindergarten! What’s more exciting than helping puppies learn to be well-rounded and confident members of their family? More info about the program can be found on our site here (plus cute puppy pictures because: why not?)

Pictured below are a few of Oluademi’s favorite daycare dogs:

Hunter  - Eager

Hunter - Eager

Luna  - Cheeky

Luna - Cheeky

Ripley  - Silly

Ripley - Silly



The Importance of Midday Rest

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When people send their dog to daycare, they typically want the dog to get some exercise, play with friends, but mostly to get tired. We have all heard that phrase, “A tired dog is a good dog!”

But while your dog is at daycare, it’s important to note that it is also beneficial for them to get some midday rest rather than engaging in non-stop play. I know what you’re thinking: you don’t want Fido to get too much rest during the day because then they’ll be wound up when they get home!

But let’s look at the facts.

Studies have shown that incorporating rest periods and naps into training actually help the dog retain more of what they learn.

Although it’s not a formal training session, your dog is constantly learning new things while at daycare. Dog-to-dog interactions are part of the social skills that dogs are constantly learning and can change from day to day. Also mixed into play are interactions with the staff: skills like Recall, waiting politely at doors, and not jumping up on people are consistently being reinforced throughout the day. Allowing your dog to take periodic rests throughout the day is crucial to their ability to absorb all of this information. Midday rest periods also helps them recharge to continue learning and better enjoy their time in the afternoon as a Full Day attendee.

Many puppies find a Half Day of daycare is sufficiently taxing. Many Full Day attendees will be given several breaks throughout their day to recoup as an alternative.

Many puppies find a Half Day of daycare is sufficiently taxing. Many Full Day attendees will be given several breaks throughout their day to recoup as an alternative.

The exact amount of necessary rest depends on the dog.

Puppies and adolescent dogs (as well as other easily over-aroused dogs) need more frequent breaks and often won’t take breaks on their own in a group setting. Some adult dogs, on the other hand, are very good at self-regulating and can take breaks willingly by choosing a comfy spot in the playroom to nap.

Much like us, dogs need balance throughout the day. A popular belief in dealing with a high-energy dog is to just keep running them until they are so tired that they pass out for a few hours. But forcing too much exercise and stimulus on a high-energy dog can actually make them even more high-strung and energetic! Although dogs do need to run and blow off steam, there should be a balance with calm, restful periods in between to help them mentally refocus and could prevent accidental injury due to over-exertion.

Some dogs are comfortable taking breaks while play continues around them. More often, puppies and easily aroused dogs need a break in our Slumber Room, away from all the commotion.

Some dogs are comfortable taking breaks while play continues around them. More often, puppies and easily aroused dogs need a break in our Slumber Room, away from all the commotion.

Although cots are available to lay on in the daycare play space, not all dogs will allow others to take a much-needed rest!

Although cots are available to lay on in the daycare play space, not all dogs will allow others to take a much-needed rest!

It’s important to note that there are different types of stress.

There is both good stress and bad stress; the excitement and arousal of a game of fetch and the nervousness of a vet visit both elicit similar physical reactions in the dog’s body. Ultimately it is their emotional reaction to the situation that dictates if the stress is “positive” or “negative”.

The problem arises when a dog continues to be highly aroused and excited for a prolonged period of time. This positive stress (called “eustress”) triggers hormones to flood the bloodstream. If the dog continues to be highly aroused, the body continues to pump out hormones that are unable to dissipate - further adding to their arousal level. This creates a feedback cycle of the dog being highly aroused, leading people to think they need more exercise, which causes more stress and hormones to be released, which then leads to an unruly dog seemingly in need of even more exercise!

Even when the stress is positive, like with play and fun exercise, the body isn’t meant to maintain a high level of stress for long periods of time. By prolonging the stress, a dog’s body chemistry can actually change and this state of high arousal and hyperactivity becomes the dog’s normal state.


So how do you make sure your dog is tired but not negatively affected by too much excitement?

A combination of play, rest periods, and mental (non-physical) activities is the key. Getting a dog’s brain working for a short time can be just as exhausting as a long period of exercise! Mixing up periods of play, rest breaks, and brain games - like practicing obedience skills, elective activities, and food puzzles - throughout the day will help your dog maximize their learning skill and minimize their stress (both good and bad).

Sometimes everyone will take a short break at the same time together!

Sometimes everyone will take a short break at the same time together!

Often the older and less social dogs will rest while everyone continues to play.

Often the older and less social dogs will rest while everyone continues to play.

Most dogs prefer a private space to enjoy a special frozen treat or undisturbed nap.

Most dogs prefer a private space to enjoy a special frozen treat or undisturbed nap.

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